Nutmeg

nutmeg.flowerNutmeg is an ancient spice and medicine used in the Middle East since 700AD and later by the Europeans in the middle ages.  It is now a common household spice that comes from the Myristica fragrans tree from the Indonesian Banda Islands- or Spice Islands.

The “nut” is an apricot-like fruit kernel dried and ground into a powder or made into an oil.  Make sure you use a quality nutmegpowdered form that is not irradiated or from BWP (broken-wormy-punky) nuts and purchase from a reputable source. The freshly grated powder is the best, freshest form.

Nutmeg as a spice used in baking, cooking, teas & drinks and combines well with Cinnamon, Cloves and Ginger and also produces the spice “mace”.  Mace is the red membrane (arial) that covers the seed and is used similarly nutmeg_plant_macewith a less sweet but more delicate of a flavor than nutmeg.

Traditionally, Nutmeg powder has been used in herbal medicine for digestion (flatulence), nervousness/anxiety and for colds & flu as it breaks up chest congestion.  It can be taken in pill, tea or tincture form, alone or combined with other herbs.  The essential oil has many external uses from arthritis, exhaustion, rheumatism / joints, stimulant and as an aphrodisiac.  It blends well with other essential oils like Coriander, Clary Sage & Lavender and is a fixative for citrus oils.

Use nutmeg in small amounts and excersize caution and moderation as it can have mild hallucinogenic effects.  Women who may be pregnant or lactating should avoid Nutmegnutmeg.

The following information is for education purposes and not for self diagnosis. Always consult with your healthcare professional when needed.

Sarsparilla

Sarsaparilla.flowersJamaican Sarsaparilla (Smilax ornate) & Indian Sarsaparilla (Hemidesmus indicus) are brambled, woody vines producing small flowers and black, blue, or red berry-like fruits. The root has been used for centuries by the indigenous peoples of Asia and Central & South America for sexual impotence, rheumatism, skin ailments, headaches, general tonic, joint pain, and against the common cold.

sarsaparilla.berriesEuropean physicians consider sarsaparilla root a tonic, blood purifier, diuretic, sweat promoter, and also use for hypertension, gout, digestive disorders, psoriasis, skin diseases, and cancer.

Sarsaparilla tastes great in tea and can also be taken in capsule form.  Drink ½ to 1 cup 2-3 times a day or 1-2 gram capsules twice daily (for short term use, may cause abdominal discomfort if taken in high doses or for long periods of time.)

The following information is for educational purposes and not for self diagnosis.  Always consult with your health care professional whenever needed.